How To Hack Wordpress Site?
How To Hack Wordpress Site?

Check to see if my site is blacklisted

You may find yourself performing a site blacklist search to determine if your site has been blacklisted by authorities. This is something you don’t want to do. The good news is that you can learn basic security awareness and avoid it. These are some tips.

How do I check if my site is blacklisted?

  • Secure your server
  • Select a content management system that is well-supported
  • Limit the number of third-party add-ons you use
  • Manage your users

There are four steps that you can take to avoid having your site blacklisted. These steps are:

  • Secure your server
  • Select a content management system that is well-supported
  • Limit the number of third-party add-ons you use
  • Manage your users

1. Secure your server

Hackers can basically infiltrate websites in two ways. These can be done by exploiting vulnerabilities in the website or the server hosting it. Both of these are your responsibility.

Practically, however, SMBs will not be responsible for website security. They will use third-party vendors to provide server capacity. If this is the case, it’s important to select a host that prioritizes security, even though it may mean paying a little more.

2. 2. Choose a content management system that is well-supported

For the smallest SMBs, it might be worth looking at an all-in-one web-building solution that combines hosting and a proprietary CMS. This route will limit your vendor’s support, but it may not be an issue for you.

You have many design options, and the general functionality (e.g. Support for e-commerce is likely to be sufficient for small and medium-sized businesses. The vendor basically takes care of all technical aspects.

You can also look into open-source CMS systems if you need more. Do your research. Make sure you do your research. WordPress is a popular choice, but it’s not the only one. You need to understand what you can do to protect it. Failure to update your CMS system or associated software (e.g. SMBs often find themselves in need of plugins or scripts to update their CMS systems and/or associated software (e.g.

3. Limit the number of third-party add-ons you use

The popularity of major CMS, especially WordPress, is due to the wide range of third-party extensions. There are many great options available, and most of them are free. Some really bad options are malware-like or poorly written. There are many options in the middle that might be useful but could have security implications. It is safer to limit your options to the most popular ones and to do extensive research.

4. Manage your users

Websites are often hacked because of poor user management. This can be avoided by limiting the access of anyone with back-end access to your website.

Determine the tasks that must be completed and determine the access level required. Next, determine the minimum number needed to perform your tasks effectively. This number must be able to function in real life, not just on paper. Also, consider the possibility of staff absences.

Each user should be given a username. Make sure they know that you expect them each to use a strong and unique password. This is a difficult task. Make sure they are aware that education is key to protecting your website’s security. If possible, back this up with two-factor authentication.

These credentials can only be used for their own purposes. TFA can be used to discourage people from sharing login information, but it is not always possible, especially if people work in the same physical area. However, you can control the sharing of login details by making sure that everyone has access to their login details. If this is done, there are robust but fair, actions taken.